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SGA and Student Council Serving Nonstop

Evaluating the oft-ignored role student government plays in student life at BK

Megan Yates | Staff Reporter

The cacophony of voices resonating from room 201, where Student Council meets twice monthly, is supposed to be a sign that student ideas are being heard. Yet many students on campus cannot answer the questions of what Student Council actually does.

For starters, the distinction between Student Government Association and Student Council is confused by many. The Student Council representatives are the seven Student Government Association, or SGA, officers that are juniors and seniors. The Student Council is the six representatives for each grade level, which include president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, and senators. The officers of Student Council meet twice a month to discuss school affairs, like what events are coming up and what needs to be changed or fixed in the school.

“The role of Student Council is to help the issues and concerns of students, and also to organize the events like homecoming, the seventh grade dance, and other activities,” junior class president Michael Sissine said.

Student Council is in the business of giving the student body what it wants, and sometimes that means making improvements to age-old traditions. Sissine alluded to a particular focus on the 2017 homecoming dance.

“We are getting a new DJ, changing the theme up a lot, and we are going to do a lot more with homecoming this year,” Sissine said. “That’s going to be our main focus.”

Since this will be the first homecoming for incoming freshman, Student Council knows the expectation is an unforgettable night that freshman can look back and remember fondly. The success of the event lies solely on their shoulders, and homecoming is not their only obligation.

“StuCo handles Student of the Month, Homecoming, Chili cook-off, winter spirit week, winter pep rally, Office of Guidance Services’ parent nights, and more,” Student Council sponsor and guidance counselor Scott Sberna said.

Sberna has sponsored Student Council for six years now, and each student government has its own faculty sponsor, but the students insist they do not depend on the sponsors to do the work.

“We only really use the sponsors as a tool and utility to get our message conveyed to the administrative boards,” Sissine said.

These student representatives are obligated to be exemplary students; the qualifications include a minimum GPA of 2.5, satisfactory recommendations from their prior and current teachers, good standing with the Dean’s Office, an interview with Mr. Sberna, and election by the student body.

So, resist the urge to ask what the student leaders of Bishop Kenny are doing to make the school a better place, and consider that these elected officials, who have families, coursework, part-time jobs, and athletics to juggle, just like you do, are setting aside their time to support the Bishop Kenny community and organize events and activities at the school.

The Student News Site of Bishop Kenny High School
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